Where Should I Start?

OK, here’s what I do: I meet someone who wants to change their body, either functionally or aesthetically (actually most often it’s actually a complex, opaque amalgamation of the two). After determining where they are, physically-speaking, I decide how I can help them go where they want to go, and try to communicate that to them.

As such, I spend about half my time understanding where someone is currently--the industry term is “assessment”--and the other half thinking about what they can do to change (fit-biz term: “intervention”).

 And then we get to work.

We talk, we laugh, we move, we cry, we sweat, we think, we make plans, and we abandon them. We shed the parts that don’t serve us, and we hone in on the stuff that works. Together we are actively creating change, as specific as possible to that person.

Meaningful Measurement

When facing the question of whether or not to measure someone's work in the gym, we must contend with these two, contradictory world-views... Do we measure doggedly, to "prove" that the physical work results, over time, in trackable results? Or do we allow someone's internal environment/experience to take precedence, with all the randomness and uncertainty that goes along with it? We Fitness Alchemists have a simple answer: BOTH

Doing the Right Thing

Doing the Right Thing

Fitness is, on its face, about helping people achieve real, meaningful changes to their bodies, health, and capabilities. It's about improving weaknesses, functioning better, and living more richly. With that promise, fitness grabs our collective attention as an alluring and fulfilling goal, something worth investing real time, money, and focus. 

As with any investment, we care about the results; in fact, the more we invest, the more we care.  Of course, we care about the "return" on our investment--what has changed--but, because it's our sweat turning the crank, we also care how it feels getting there. So if we care so much, and have invested so deeply, shouldn't we also care about the tools we're using to get there?

Kitchen Alchemy: TFA Chicken Soup

Kitchen Alchemy: TFA Chicken Soup

Over lunch the other day (while enjoying the homemade chicken soup recipe included here), Hannah and I got to talking about how inspired we get by food that just seems to fall together--easily, cheaply, nutritiously. In this case, two rotisserie chickens (one of our favorite quick grabs), bought to make curried chicken salad the week before, had then become homemade bone broth (or, pretty much the healthiest thing you can make in your own kitchen...), and that broth had become this soup. 

This Year, Let Your Garden Grow

This Year, Let Your Garden Grow

Well, it's that time of year again. January. Resolution season. Blank slate, fresh start, New You! Also known as: where best intentions go to die.  January is too often the time when lovely, admirable intentions are made (January 1), acted on (January 2) and then abandoned (January 5). By the end of the month, we're usually back to our regularly scheduled programming, and feeling very much like we did the year before. Coach Will shares how to break this cycle, and actually follow through on your resolutions.

Want to change? Get a coach.

Want to change? Get a coach.

We're in the business of changing bodies. 
Not overnight--that's called plastic surgery--and not just for looks (although that is definitely a goal for some of our clients). No, we are focused on one thing: working with you, now, where you are, to be better. 

Now that I'm working out, what should I eat?

Now that I'm working out, what should I eat?

Should I eat pre-workout carbs? Do I need a post-workout shake? For the person just getting started (or re-started) with their fitness, addressing the basic building blocks of nutrition will have a far bigger impact than any changes to your so-called “workout fueling”. That means getting a handle on WHAT you are eating, HOW MUCH food you need, and what kind of PLAN will actually work for your lifestyle. In this post, I want to give an overview of the key components to pay attention to as you move toward a better nutritional approach, and some general recommendations that work for most people as they get started.