Doing the Right Thing

Doing the Right Thing

Fitness is, on its face, about helping people achieve real, meaningful changes to their bodies, health, and capabilities. It's about improving weaknesses, functioning better, and living more richly. With that promise, fitness grabs our collective attention as an alluring and fulfilling goal, something worth investing real time, money, and focus. 

As with any investment, we care about the results; in fact, the more we invest, the more we care.  Of course, we care about the "return" on our investment--what has changed--but, because it's our sweat turning the crank, we also care how it feels getting there. So if we care so much, and have invested so deeply, shouldn't we also care about the tools we're using to get there?

Kitchen Alchemy: TFA Chicken Soup

Kitchen Alchemy: TFA Chicken Soup

Over lunch the other day (while enjoying the homemade chicken soup recipe included here), Hannah and I got to talking about how inspired we get by food that just seems to fall together--easily, cheaply, nutritiously. In this case, two rotisserie chickens (one of our favorite quick grabs), bought to make curried chicken salad the week before, had then become homemade bone broth (or, pretty much the healthiest thing you can make in your own kitchen...), and that broth had become this soup. 

This Year, Let Your Garden Grow

This Year, Let Your Garden Grow

Well, it's that time of year again. January. Resolution season. Blank slate, fresh start, New You! Also known as: where best intentions go to die.  January is too often the time when lovely, admirable intentions are made (January 1), acted on (January 2) and then abandoned (January 5). By the end of the month, we're usually back to our regularly scheduled programming, and feeling very much like we did the year before. Coach Will shares how to break this cycle, and actually follow through on your resolutions.

Want to change? Get a coach.

Want to change? Get a coach.

We're in the business of changing bodies. 
Not overnight--that's called plastic surgery--and not just for looks (although that is definitely a goal for some of our clients). No, we are focused on one thing: working with you, now, where you are, to be better. 

Now that I'm working out, what should I eat?

Now that I'm working out, what should I eat?

Should I eat pre-workout carbs? Do I need a post-workout shake? For the person just getting started (or re-started) with their fitness, addressing the basic building blocks of nutrition will have a far bigger impact than any changes to your so-called “workout fueling”. That means getting a handle on WHAT you are eating, HOW MUCH food you need, and what kind of PLAN will actually work for your lifestyle. In this post, I want to give an overview of the key components to pay attention to as you move toward a better nutritional approach, and some general recommendations that work for most people as they get started. 

Start Where You Are

It certainly is easiest to think about fitness in bold cateogries. You know the kind I mean: "Get RIPPED!" "Lose 12 pounds in 6 days" "12 Weeks to Huge Arms". 

You'll notice that the one thing in common is that the result being offered is always a superlative, somewhat shocking, "over there where the grass is greener" kind of goal. In fact, they are all characterized by their END-goal. That's a big problem. 

Now, I don't doubt that some of those programs might get you the results if followed to a T--they might. And of course, those results might stick (or not) at the end of said program. But that's not what I'm writing about today. Today, I want to call out how backwards that kind of thinking is when it comes to helping people improve. 

We can all agree that life happens in an up-and-down way, with some days feeling great and some just feeling like dogshit. Some days start well, and get worse; sometimes it's the opposite. And sometimes, everything is just normal (not that often, though). In fact, the only constant is the change. 

But when someone decides that it's time to dig back into fitness, or get started for the first time, they are usually pretty adamant about rejecting where they are currently, their personal status quo, and they're ready to disrupt that status quo. Honestly, that desire to break things, smash the status quo, might be the ONLY thing they are sure about. 

They don't really know what to do--exercise? cardio? weights? yoga? how much? when? how long? are you my mother?!--which is why they need a coach! But they are damn sure that they want to change. 

"Coach, make me better."

As a coach trying to integrate with this amorphous collection of experiences and knowledge and wants and needs, my first job is to tune-in to their ups and downs. More than understanding what makes them "tick", I am trying to empathize with when they're feeling good, and when they're down. I'm trying to understand their status quo. 

As I start to understand their personal, unique undulating pattern of good/bad (their own personal wave), I start giving them little nuggets that are appropriate for where they are, that day, month, or year. 

Change is a process, not just another, greener pasture. Until you tune into where you are, you'll never get started in earnest. 

Build a Foundation of Slow

Build a Foundation of Slow

People like to move fast. They like to move fast even when there's no good reason to move fast. Between the notifications popping up on their phone all hours of the day and night and the BuzzFeed articles describing the life-changing benefits of Stupid High Intensity Training (S.H.I.T.), there is an over-urgency surrounding everything that seems important. 

But the reality is that most of the physical work we all need involves slowing down, at least part of the time. And while I like to tickle my chakras in yoga class, too, that's not exactly what I'm talking about. No, what I'm describing is about taking the time, often under intense loads and resistance, to gain understanding of where our bodies are in space.